Animals at war

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Khokhlova Ekaterina Konstantinovna
Cavalry scout, Senior Sergeant I. I. Puzhko on patrol
At the Brandenburg Gate
A detachment under the command of Lebedev is sent with dogs-tank destroyers to carry out a combat mission,
Polish Army private
Defeat of Germans near Moscow
Carrying the wounded out from the front line
Cavalry recon platoon before a combat operation. Political instructor S.V. Kozlov (left) and Lieutenant A.A. Vasilistov clarify the plan of the operation.
Guerrilla commander A.F. Fedorov with his orderly (standing with a horse)
Farmers of one of the villages of the Kiev region drive cattle from the front line. September 1941
Zlufarov Umer Kubedinovich
Horse patrol at Manezhnaya Square
Horse train. Western front
Red Army soldiers prepare improvised dog-drawn carts to transport the wounded to a military hospital, Orel Region, 1943
Sending wounded Red Army soldier from forward position to a hospital by string of sled dogs
Preparing wounded Red Army soldier for transportation to a field hospital by sled dogs string
Red Army soldiers change a firing position of anti-tank gun to the southwest of Klaipeda, October 1944
Friends-scouts, 1942
Reindeers deliver bombs to the Pe-2 aircraft
Reindeers deliver bombs to the Pe-2 aircraft
Arctic Dogs
Khokhlova Ekaterina Konstantinovna
Cavalry scout, Senior Sergeant I. I. Puzhko on patrol
At the Brandenburg Gate
A detachment under the command of Lebedev is sent with dogs-tank destroyers to carry out a combat mission,
Polish Army private
Defeat of Germans near Moscow
Carrying the wounded out from the front line
Cavalry recon platoon before a combat operation. Political instructor S.V. Kozlov (left) and Lieutenant A.A. Vasilistov clarify the plan of the operation.
Guerrilla commander A.F. Fedorov with his orderly (standing with a horse)
Farmers of one of the villages of the Kiev region drive cattle from the front line. September 1941
Zlufarov Umer Kubedinovich
Horse patrol at Manezhnaya Square
Horse train. Western front
Red Army soldiers prepare improvised dog-drawn carts to transport the wounded to a military hospital, Orel Region, 1943
Sending wounded Red Army soldier from forward position to a hospital by string of sled dogs
Preparing wounded Red Army soldier for transportation to a field hospital by sled dogs string
Red Army soldiers change a firing position of anti-tank gun to the southwest of Klaipeda, October 1944
Friends-scouts, 1942
Reindeers deliver bombs to the Pe-2 aircraft
Reindeers deliver bombs to the Pe-2 aircraft
Arctic Dogs

Zlufarov Umer Kubedinovich

The Great Patriotic War is the most tragic page in the history of our state and the whole world. It left the deepest trace in the life of every family, and victory came at too great a price. This national tragedy has not bypassed our family. We are proud that our grandfather, Zlufarov Umer Kubedinovich, was a soldier of this war and forged the Great Victory. Grandfather was born in the village of Kuchuk Ozenbash Bakhchisarai district in a peasant family. He graduated from high school and then entered the Chair trade school in Koreiz village. From 1932 to 1939, Umer Kubedinovich was a student at the Crimean Agricultural Institute named after Kalinin and received a specialty in winemaking and viticulture. In 1939 he got married. At first, after graduating from the Institute, he worked as a winemaker in Sudak District, and in 1940 he was transferred to the post of chief winemaker at Yalta winery of Crimea. Fate promised bright future, prospects were seen, plans were made... But the war started. On July 16, 1941, Umer Kubedinovich was mobilized to the southern front. He began the war as the chief of the construction detachment, because by that time he had completed army service and knew the military business. The task of the detachment was to erect defensive lines on the outskirts of the city of Krasnodar. Here, he was also awarded a diploma of the 9th Directorate of Non-Profit Organizations. From 1942 to 1943, he studied at the Blagoveshchensk Machine-gun School in Bashkir SSR. After graduation, he commanded a tank company of the 36th Tank Brigade of the 4th Stalingrad Guard. The tank landing force was breaking through into the enemy zone, distracting the enemy, while the main forces were developing the offensive. In my grandfather's memory, like potographs, came up horrible moments: "Once, the path ran through a vast meadow covered with corpses, and as the tanks passed, parts of human bodies hit the body of the combat vehicle.” Party members were obliged to command penal companies for 3 months, but due to the absence of a replacement for the guard, Lieutenant Zlufarov Umer Kubedinovich had to manage 208 separate army penal companies for almost half a year in 1944. The commander was required to have special stamina and the ability to influence the subordinates with his authority. Umer Kubedinovich coped with the command of the company and had special respect, both among his subordinates and those of the superior command. With the battles of the Guards, the lieutenant passed through Ukraine, Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary and Austria, was wounded 4 times (certificate № 6229, № 609, № 1371, № 28), has 16 awards, including the Order of "Patriotic War I and II degrees", the Order of Courage, 8 medals, 3 thanks and 1 diploma from the Krasnodar Regional Council. He was demobilized from Vienna in 1945, and he was told: 'Comrade Lieutenant, if you want to live in Crimea, you need to change your passport'. At that time, the family was already deported from Crimea; he found relatives in one of the villages of Namanganskaya Oblast, Uzbek SSR. On the basis of medical report, he managed to transfer the family to Frunze town, Kyrgyz SSR, where he continued working as head of chemical and technological laboratory at fruit and vegetable station. Then he was appointed chief winemaker and chief champagne maker of the Kyrgyz Champagne Plant. He was awarded the sign "Excellent worker of food industry of the USSR" and the sign "Excellent worker of state farm of Kyrgyz SSR". In 1958 he was awarded the big silver medal of VDNKh of the USSR. At the tasting of European countries champagne plant received a large gold medal of Europe for Kyrgyz dry champagne. Umer Kubedinovich did not allowe even his nephew into the bottling shop, as he worked as a driver, and the smell of gasoline could affect the quality of wine. In 1962 he moved to the city of Yangiyul, Tashkent region, Uzbek SSR, where he worked as a shift supervisor at the hydrolysis plant. Pre-war colleagues and rector of Crimean Agricultural Institute named after Kalinin repeatedly advised Umer Kubedinovich to move to Crimea. On September 5, 1967, USSR Supreme Soviet's Presidium's Decree 'On citizens of Tatar nationality living in Crimea' was issued, and certain part of Crimean Tatars believed and decided to use this decree. Having often sold their houses for a fraction of the price, they began to return to Crimea. Lieutenant Umer Kubedinovich Zlufarov, the pre-war winemaker at Yalta Guards' Winery, was among the first. In 1968, the Zlufarovs' family bought a resettled house in Simferopol, but couldn't get a residence permit for over 6 months. From one instance they were sent to the next, and then everything was repeated in a circle. Four times Umer Kubedinovich was at a reception with N.V. Bagrov, who after a short conversation assured: "Go, I'll call - they will give you a residence permit". Each time the passport office answered: "Nobody called us". The last conversation with N.V. Bagrov took place in a slightly higher tone and ended with the following phrase: "If you want to live in the Crimea, speak a tone lower. Go ahead, I will call". And this time the answer in the passport office was the same. Then, Umer Kubedinovich began to put hope only in patience of his wife: 'Fatime Mamutovna, I can no longer vouch for myself, now you try to finish the job. The policeman regularly visited the Zlyufarovs' family under various pretexts, and only Fatime Mamutovna's hospitality and tact prevented the policeman from doing what they did to others who lived without a residence permit. And such people in the town were mostly officers, pre-war officials, such as pilot A. I. Reshidov, Hero of the Soviet Union, Captain O. N. Memetov, representative of the Crimean ASSR People's Commissariat of Land Resources, who after long attempts, having undergone a humiliating procedure, got registered. Fatime Mamutovna for another 4 months beat the doorsteps of the passport table, listening to various bureaucratic tricks. Only stamina and patience helped her to get registered. The registration allowed her to look for a job and to get rid of intrigues of local authorities. In addition to Umer Kubedinovich, 4 war veterans lived in this alley of the city and every year they were congratulated on Victory Day, and the lieutenant's guards was ignored, but despite this, he hung the Red Flag over his house every year. Opposite the Zlyufarovs' yard was the house of the family of another war veteran - pilot navigator Rikman M., who, together with Amet-khan Sultan, graduated from the Kachinsk Flying School and went through the entire war. Friendly relations of these two families have been maintained by their children and grandchildren from the first days of their return to the present day. After receiving registration (not without the help of his pre-war colleagues), Umer Kubedinovich got a job at the head winery № 1 in the city of Simferopol and was appointed head of the souvenir shop, where the highest sorts of cognac were poured into small containers. Having worked at this factory for more than 10 years as a good worker and specialist, he was honored to receive a well-deserved retirement.
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