Order of Alexander Nevsky

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Kazimov Enver Ibrahimovic

Kovalev Andrey Matveyevich
Captain K. Samsonov, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 380th Rifle Regiment
Captain K. Samsonov, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 380th Rifle Regiment
Captain S. Neustroev, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 756th Rifle Regiment
Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 756th Rifle Regiment, Captain S. Neustroev
Participants of the storming of the Reichstag and the hoisting of the Victory Banner over it on May 1, 1945
Participants of the storming of the Reichstag and the hoisting of the Victory Banner over it on May 1, 1945
Kazimov Enver Ibrahimovic
Kazimov Enver Ibrahimovic

Kovalev Andrey Matveyevich
Captain K. Samsonov, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 380th Rifle Regiment
Captain K. Samsonov, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 380th Rifle Regiment
Captain S. Neustroev, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 756th Rifle Regiment
Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 756th Rifle Regiment, Captain S. Neustroev
Participants of the storming of the Reichstag and the hoisting of the Victory Banner over it on May 1, 1945
Participants of the storming of the Reichstag and the hoisting of the Victory Banner over it on May 1, 1945
Kazimov Enver Ibrahimovic

Kovalev Andrey Matveyevich
Captain K. Samsonov, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 380th Rifle Regiment
Captain K. Samsonov, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 380th Rifle Regiment
Captain S. Neustroev, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 756th Rifle Regiment
Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 756th Rifle Regiment, Captain S. Neustroev
Participants of the storming of the Reichstag and the hoisting of the Victory Banner over it on May 1, 1945
Participants of the storming of the Reichstag and the hoisting of the Victory Banner over it on May 1, 1945
Kazimov Enver Ibrahimovic
Kazimov Enver Ibrahimovic

Kovalev Andrey Matveyevich
Captain K. Samsonov, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 380th Rifle Regiment
Captain K. Samsonov, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 380th Rifle Regiment
Captain S. Neustroev, Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 756th Rifle Regiment
Commander of the 1st Rifle Battalion of the 756th Rifle Regiment, Captain S. Neustroev
Participants of the storming of the Reichstag and the hoisting of the Victory Banner over it on May 1, 1945
Participants of the storming of the Reichstag and the hoisting of the Victory Banner over it on May 1, 1945

Kazimov Enver Ibrahimovic

Title - senior lieutenant. The type of troops - artillery. Division - 1st Guards Rifle Division, Platoon Commander. Born on May 5, 1920 in a lacksk family in the village Aliabad, Zakatala district, Azerbaijan SSR. At the age of 19, he graduated from Zakatala Pedagogical School, but did not have time to work as a teacher - after 4 months he was drafted to serve in the Red Army. Thus, the military service of Azerbaijani Laktic Enver Ibrahimovich Kazimov, full of tragedy and triumph, began. Unfortunately, we failed to meet and talk to this brave warrior who, despite the vicissitudes of fate, remained a true patriot, a faithful defender of the Motherland. On December 29, 1939, Enver Kazimov was drafted into the active army, then there was a war, which was called the Finnish Company, or the Finnish War, or the Winter War. A young, strong young man was eager to "fight". But he, as a man with a good education, was sent to study in the regimental school of the 102nd SDS 10th of the Western Special Military District. 6 months after graduation, in June 1940, Enver Kazimov was appointed commander of the machine-gun branch of the 124th Engineer Army of the Volga Military District. Upon arrival in his place, E. Kazimov was appointed commander of the department of the training battalion 130th of the 6th Army, where he trained machine gunners. In April 41st year with gratitude to the military leadership for the training of good machine-gunners E. Kazimov was appointed commander of the machine-gun platoon. A young junior lieutenant (he received this rank after completing a 4-month course at the Zhitomir Military and Infantry School) was intensively training and coaching his machine gunners. The air smelled like war. The civilians may not have noticed it, but for a military man, the threat was obvious. On the first day of the war, Enver Kazimov and his machine gunners took part in the battle. His first fight was worthy, there were also losses in his platoon, but there was no panic or cowardice, although many for the first time were face to face with death, witnessed the death of friends. Many fascists were also killed by his machine gunners. After 17-18 days of fighting Kazimov was wounded, the wound was serious, and the battalion commander ordered to send him to hospital. It wasn't easy to get to the hospital. Under bombing and artillery fire, the echelon took the wounded away from the battlefield. He was taken to the evacuation hospital in Starobelsky District, Voroshilov Region. The doctors did everything they could to bring the lieutenant back in line. Leaving the hospital in a month, Enver imagined meeting with his platoon mates when he would return to his native part. But the war had its own laws and the command had a better idea of who to direct and where to go. He was sent to the 247th of the 6th Army of the Central Front, also a platoon commander. It is known from history what intense, heavy and bloody battles took place in the first months of 1941-1942. Just as Kazimov accepted the platoon, got acquainted with his machine gunners, the platoon was attacked by superior enemy forces. To say that the battle was fierce is to say nothing. First the Germans launched mortar shells into the trenches of our fighters, then tanks with infantry went. One fascist mine exploded near the platoon commander; both machine gun numbers were killed at once. Before Kazimov could lie down next to the machine gun, the second mine stunned him and a shard of shrapnel entered his body. He almost lost consciousness when the attacking Nazis passed by. After the battle, the Germans shot the seriously wounded, and those who survived were also taken prisoners. Thus, the junior lieutenant, Kazimov's machine-gun platoon commander, was captured by the Germans. Although the hip wound was sensitive, the Germans did not shoot him because he quickly recovered. He ended up in Konotopa's prisoner war camp, Konotopa. There were thousands of Soviet POWs in that camp. Many of them made their own plans, he saw other prisoners escaping unsuccessfully, and he saw provocateurs here, who first got your trust and then gave away their own for a piece of bread. A year and seven months Enver waited for a convenient moment to escape. On March 15, 1943, he escaped from fascist captivity and hid among the villagers of village Kazakaya Konotop District, Sumy Oblast. They hid him at their own risk, understanding what it would do for them if the fascists found out. Six months later the soviet troops liberated the area, Enver Kazimov joined our troops... but he was already a soldier of the 30th Independent Penalty Battalion of the 41st 69th Army (undergoing a special check-up). All those who had been released or had escaped from captivity were being tested. They had to prove their loyalty to their homeland in battle: if you die or leave the battle wounded or maimed, then the test was passed. In this battle, Private Kazimov was seriously wounded and sent to EG № 2140 in the Gomel region, where he was treated for four months. For some time he was in the reserves of the 69th Army, and in June 1944 Enver Kazimov was restored to the rank of Jr. Lieutenant and appointed commander of the machine-gun platoon of the 2nd machine-gun company of the 2nd battalion of the 244th Brandenburg regiment of the 41st Red Banner Order of Suvorov of the 2nd Infantry Division. The commander, ready for reazl action, dreaming to prove to himself and to all that the captivity was an accidental and ridiculous episode of his life, that he was a brave warrior, that he was an honest commander and a skilful machine-gunner, fought with extraordinary bravery and despair, sometimes on the verge of risk to life. Such was a brave Dagestani man, a Lackec from Azerbaijan Enver Ibrahimovich Kazimov, who finished the war on the Elbe with the rank of senior lieutenant, who was awarded high combat awards, such as the Order of Alexander Nevsky, Patriotic War II degree, medals "For the Liberation of Warsaw", "For the capture of Berlin", "For the victory over Germany" and a number of commendations from the All-Russian Military Command. Stalin. After the war, he lived and died in Buinaksk.
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